Pros and cons of cervical epidural steroid injections

In the US, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a national, voluntary surveillance system, was set up to monitor reactions to the HPV vaccine. In an August 2009 Journal of the American Medical Association article that covered the first 30 months that the vaccine was administered, VAERS reported receiving more than 12,000 reports (a rate of 53 reports per 100,000 doses distributed), 772 of which reported serious reactions, including 32 reports of death. “There are enough reports of girls dropping dead or coming down with serious paralysis after the vaccine that I believe they shouldn’t receive it,” says Jane Orient, MD, executive director of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons. Still, the death reports were reviewed and, according to the CDC, there was no common pattern to the deaths that would suggest they were caused by the vaccine.

There are a variety of  cervical traction devices that can be recommended to patients suffering from chronic or existing neck pain, headaches caused by neck injuries, or any other type of mild to moderate neck pain. These devices should only be used with the approval of a physician, and should not be used for acute or recent injuries. Ideally, patients using these devices should be involved in ongoing therapy or regular consultation with a doctor to ensure that the traction is being done correctly and effectively in the home health setting.

Pros and cons of cervical epidural steroid injections

pros and cons of cervical epidural steroid injections

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pros and cons of cervical epidural steroid injectionspros and cons of cervical epidural steroid injectionspros and cons of cervical epidural steroid injectionspros and cons of cervical epidural steroid injectionspros and cons of cervical epidural steroid injections