Neck pain after epidural steroid injection

Dr. Tai is certified by the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation with subspecialty certification in Pain Medicine. He is licensed as a Physician by the New Jersey State Board of Medical Examiners and as an acupuncturist by the New Jersey State Acupuncture Examining Board. He is currently practicing pain management at his office in Bridgewater New Jersey, at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital-Somerset, and at Somerset Ambulatory Surgical Center.

Car accidents, and the force that goes along with them, can be seriously damaging to the neck and back . These areas of the body are both crucial to bodily function, yet sensitive to sudden movement and force. As a car slams into something, or something slams into a car, the inertia of the opposing force causes everything in the car, including a human, to move in that direction. But there’s only so much room to move in a car; eventually, the seat belt, car door, dashboard, or some other object is going to stop that forward movement. This force often generates enormous pressure on the neck and back.

The needle is smaller in size than that used during a conventional epidural approach. The procedure is performed with the patient lying on their belly using fluoroscopic (real-time x-ray) guidance, which helps to prevent damage to the nerve root. A radiopaque dye is injected to enhance the fluoroscopic images and to confirm that the needle is properly placed (See Figure 2). This technique allows the glucocorticoid medicine to be placed closer to the irritated nerve root than using conventional interlaminar epidural approach. The exposure to radiation is minimal.

This is a rare complication that may occur if a small hole is made in the fibrous sac and does not close up after the needle puncture. These small holes are only made in less than 1% of epidural injections and usually heal on their own. The spinal fluid inside can leak out, and when severe, the brain loses the cushioning effect of the fluid, which causes a severe headache when you sit or stand. These types of headaches occur typically about 2-3 days after the procedure and are positional - they come on when you sit or stand and go away when you lie down. If you do develop a spinal headache, it is OK to treat yourself. As long as you do not feel ill and have no fever and the headache goes away when you lay down, you may treat yourself with 24 hours of bed rest with bathroom privileges while drinking plenty of fluids. This almost always works. If it does not, contact the radiologist who performed the procedure or your referring physician. A procedure (called an epidural blood patch) can be performed in the hospital that has a very high success rate in treating spinal headaches.  

Arizona Pain Specialists offers the Best Pain Management Doctors in Arizona. All the doctors are Board Certified, and the practice has won FOUR Patient’s Choice Awards in a Row!
The Arizona Pain clinic locations serve Phoenix, Tempe, Mesa, Scottsdale, Chandler, Glendale, Gilbert, Apache Junction, Casa Grande, San Tan, Sun Lakes, Queen Creek, El Mirage, Sun City, Florence, Avondale, Buckeye, Peoria, Cave Creek, Prescott, Maricopa, Goodyear, Laveen, Litchfield, Ahwatukee, Tolleson, Surprise, Fountain Hills, Tonopah, Wickenburg, Litchfield, Carefree, Anthem, and Coolidge.

Neck pain after epidural steroid injection

neck pain after epidural steroid injection

This is a rare complication that may occur if a small hole is made in the fibrous sac and does not close up after the needle puncture. These small holes are only made in less than 1% of epidural injections and usually heal on their own. The spinal fluid inside can leak out, and when severe, the brain loses the cushioning effect of the fluid, which causes a severe headache when you sit or stand. These types of headaches occur typically about 2-3 days after the procedure and are positional - they come on when you sit or stand and go away when you lie down. If you do develop a spinal headache, it is OK to treat yourself. As long as you do not feel ill and have no fever and the headache goes away when you lay down, you may treat yourself with 24 hours of bed rest with bathroom privileges while drinking plenty of fluids. This almost always works. If it does not, contact the radiologist who performed the procedure or your referring physician. A procedure (called an epidural blood patch) can be performed in the hospital that has a very high success rate in treating spinal headaches.  

Media:

neck pain after epidural steroid injectionneck pain after epidural steroid injectionneck pain after epidural steroid injectionneck pain after epidural steroid injectionneck pain after epidural steroid injection