Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs

Aspirin is a first-line treatment for the fever and joint-pain symptoms of acute rheumatic fever . The therapy often lasts for one to two weeks, and is rarely indicated for longer periods. After fever and pain have subsided, the aspirin is no longer necessary, since it does not decrease the incidence of heart complications and residual rheumatic heart disease. [61] [62] Naproxen has been shown to be as effective as aspirin and less toxic, but due to the limited clinical experience, naproxen is recommended only as a second-line treatment. [61] [63]

Long-term low dose aspirin use is generally safe. An estimated 10% of the patients taking long-term aspirin (75-325 mg/day) can develop ulcers. Most of these ulcers were asymptomatic (no abdominal pain or bleeding). Patients at a higher risk of developing ulcers with low dose aspirin included elderly patients age 70 years and older, and patients with H. pylori stomach infection (see below). The risk of significant ulcer bleeding from aspirin is low (approximately 1%). One can reduce the risk of bleeding by adding a daily dose of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) that reduces stomach acid, for example, pantoprazole (Protonix), esomeprazole (Nexium), rabeprazole (Aciphex), or lansoprazole (Prevacid, Prevacid SoluTab), and omeprazole ( Prilosec , Zegerid ).

FDA reviewed a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials of cardiovascular and upper gastrointestinal events with non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), conducted by the Coxib and traditional NSAID Trialists’ (CNT) Collaboration of the Clinical Trial Service and Epidemiological Studies Units at Oxford University. 2 We also reviewed observational studies and other scientific publications in the medical literature. 1 The findings of these studies were discussed at a joint meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee held on February 10-11, 2014 (for complete safety reviews, background information, and minutes of this meeting, click here ).

Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs

aspirin and nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs

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